Candlepin Bowling

Start Betting on Candlepin Bowling Today

Candlepin Bowling has been played since the late 1800’s when it was started by Justin White, a bowling alley owner in 1880. In fact, it was being played before the regulation of the standardized sport of tenpin bowling in 1895. There are a few differences in gameplay between Candlepin Bowling and Tenpin Bowling however it’s definitely not any less enjoyable.

As Candlepin Bowling has gained popularity in more recent times, there has been a noticeable shift in the way people think about bowling. Not just as a way to pass the time, but rather as a sport, and as we are well aware: with sports come betting opportunities. One of the most exciting ways to bet on a game of Candlepin Bowling is the bracket bet. A bracket bet pits one bowler’s skill against another within the game itself, so instead of placing a wager on the game as a whole, why not place a bracket bet within the game?

The How-To’s of Candlepin Bowling

As you can imagine, Candlepin Bowling is similar to the standard Tenpin Bowling. The maple wood lane has an approach range of between 4.3 and 4.9 metres, and the lane itself is approximately 1 metre wide, belted on each side with a gutter. The pins are shaped like, you guessed it – candles, and are approximately 40cm tall, and unlike traditional pins, do not have a distinctive top and bottom end.

Ten Candlepins are placed at a range of 18m from the stop line, which cannot be crossed, and are numbered and placed from 1-10 much like in the traditional form. However, Candlepin Bowling is made trickier by the formation of the pins themselves. Due to their smaller diameter, a chain reaction of the pins knocking each other over is hard to accomplish, and only the most skilled of bowlers can achieve a ‘strike’. The biggest difference between the lanes is the surface on which the pins stand. Unlike in traditional bowling, the Candlepins are placed on a hard plate, usually made of metal, which is slightly lower than the lane itself.

Biggest Differences of Candlepin Bowling

In Candlepin Bowling, each player uses 3 balls per frame, as opposed to the 2 balls used in the traditional game. These balls are also remarkably smaller, at only approximately 11cm in circumference, and they do not have any finger holes. The weight of the ball does not exceed the weight of a single Candlepin, which cannot exceed 1kg. Due to the size of the ball versus the pins, the difficulty is increased in trying to knock them down. Unlike a game of Tenpin Bowling the pins are not cleared in between balls which also increase the difficulty of knocking down the pins.

Candlepin Bowling Today

As Candlepin Bowling gains popularity in the contemporary sporting world, numerous leagues have been formed. Championships and tournaments take place throughout the year, and many betting opportunities have come to the fore. Players can place bets for the winner of the tournament, wagers on the outcome down to the final scores, or even bracket bets within the game. Bracket bets can make the game even more exciting, as wagers can be placed on two players pitted against each other within the tournament as a whole. For instance, players can place wagers against how many points two players will score against each other, apart from the tournament as a whole.